Tag Archives: disability

How I got my job: Data Support Officer at the NHS

ZachZach completed a Masters in Management at Leeds in 2015, following an undergraduate degree at another university and now works as a Data Support Officer at  the NHS in Leeds.  In this post he shares his experiences of finding his way in a challenging graduate job market, developing self-confidence,  and how he benefitted from accessing careers support.

The modern, conventional graduate is an interesting, enviable breed to behold. They flood the job market every July; they are the peak of their game, usually at a time before mortgages and child bearing clamp in: Usually, their experience is at rock bottom, but their enthusiasm and sheer innovation is sky high. And pre-2008, employers would have awarded contracts to many on the basis of this enthusiasm and innovation alone. Continue reading

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How I got my job: Corporate Partnerships Assistant at Leonard Cheshire Disability

Rhiann

Rhiann (2nd from right in second row) during her ICS placement in Senegal.

Rhiann has just completed her English & Sociology degree at Leeds and is now undertaking a graduate internship with Leonard Cheshire Disability.  In this post she discusses the value of taking a placement year and what she’s learnt about managing a health condition and choosing if and when to disclose a health condition or disability to an employer.

My current role

I work at the charity Leonard Cheshire Disability as a Corporate Partnerships Assistant. I am part of their Change100 internship scheme, which partners disabled students/graduates with top employers around the country. My job involves leading a proposal for £150,000 worth of funding to develop gardening programmes for the disabled people we support. I recently finished my English and Sociology degree at Leeds, which I combined with a placement year through the Careers Centre. I would really encourage students to make the most of the careers support available at Leeds. The range of opportunities they offer is fantastic, and this was how I discovered Change 100. Continue reading

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Tackling the Application Process & Being Open about a Disability: Part Two

disability

In part two of our ‘Tackling the Application Process & Being Open about Disabilities’ series, we are continuing the discussion on whether applicants should be open about their disability and what makes an application stand out.

Should I be open about my disability at the application stage?

It is your decision whether and when to be open about a disability and a careers adviser can help you to explore the pros and cons, so that you can make that decision. There are some exceptions, for example, if you have a condition like epilepsy that has health and safety implications – beyond these exceptions it is up to you.

A graduate I saw recently was advised by her friend not to be open about her disability on application forms. After numerous unsuccessful applications she decided to ignore this advice and successfully applied and got a great graduate job!

Take time to write a quality application

Research complete, you can now start writing your application. Written applications come in different formats, generally it is a covering letter and CV or an application form. Here are some general pointers:

  • Application form questions are generally based on your interest in the role and organisation (commitment), competencies (skills) and personal strengths (behaviours).
  • Have you researched the organisation thoroughly enough to address your interest in them and the role?
  • Examine the job description: what specific skills and attributes are they looking for?
  • Select recent and relevant competency examples from your university life and degree, extra-curricular activities and work experience. The ‘STAR’ approach here is an ideal way of articulating your skills.
  • Quality check your letter writing etiquette – how to structure and avoid minor mistakes that will put your application in the ‘no’ pile e.g. ending your letter ‘Yours faithfully’ when writing to a named person, grammar and spelling errors. Structure, format and write your CV succinctly. You can also check our website for more information and resources on applications.

Checking before pressing send is a must! If you have a disability that affects your written communication skills (spelling and grammar) have your application checked by someone else before sending and use all the resources at your disposal.

Resilience

This is now a commonly used term associated with being successful in the workplace and you will need more of this than other applicants (add link to resilience article). Legislation will support your path to employment but you cannot rely solely on it. Be persistent, curious and learn how to articulate your added value, abilities and diversity. In addition, make good use of disability services, your careers service and other support available to you.

Need further advice/guidance? Make sure to check out the resources available on our website and book an appointment to talk to us.

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Tackling the Application Process & Being Open about a Disability: Part 1

disability

Steve Bone is a Careers Consultant at Leeds University, he supports students applying for graduate opportunities and advises his careers colleagues on inclusivity. In this blog, he highlights observations of the additional challenges faced by students with disabilities and shares advice on how to overcome these. This blogpost was originally published on Myplus Students Club.

Remember, you have something extra!

When supporting students with a variety of disabilities (both physical and unseen), what strikes me is that a positive approach to the application process is key. Successful applicants reflect on their ABILITIES and articulate these positively, alongside disabilities that the employer can make ‘reasonable adjustments’ for in the workplace.

Getting through to the application stage is a challenge; have I understated this? For prospective undergraduates who are unaware of their dyslexia, it is even tougher! So when I heard that an undergraduate, unaware of his dyslexia, had managed a successful application for an internship, I wanted to know how. Continue reading

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