Tag Archives: Engineering

A helping hand for medical engineers

Medical device engineering is an innovative field in healthcare but there’s not a lot of information out there about careers and employers. So, for all you medical engineers, Suzie Bullock, Careers Adviser, provides a brief overview about what’s available.

Where to start

The first point of call for careers information for students and graduates is usually prospects.ac.uk but there isn’t a job profile specifically for medical device engineers. The closest source of careers information is biomedical engineer.

Many medical engineers work in the NHS but if you choose to work in the private sector and want to gain chartered status, the most relevant professional bodies are:

To find a job, these sites are useful:

If you want to stay in Leeds, which is a thriving city for its healthcare sector, there are some reports on medical technology and investment in Leeds, which you might find interesting:

Recruitment agencies in medical engineering include:

Employers in the area are:

You could also use job search sites such as indeed and simplyhired to look for medical device engineer roles.

If you want to approach a company or find a job to apply for, there is information on speculative applications, CVs, cover letters and application forms on our careers website.

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Laidlaw Undergraduate Research and Leadership Scholarship

Ghadir Ghasemi is a Laidlaw Scholar in the final year of his Chemical Engineering degree, find out how he has developed his research and leadership skills through this funded scholarship.

Laidlaw Scholarships are open to first year undergraduates, providing the opportunity to develop leadership and research skills through a range of personal development activities and two six week periods of project work.

 

How did you secure your scholarship?

I initially found out about this scholarship through an email from the Engineering Employability suite. I took the time to read all the information given about this  and was required to submit an initial application which consisted of four different questions-its main aims were to demonstrate my suitability to the proposed research project and to the scholarship as a whole, with regards to the leadership aspect.

The application process was very straightforward. Once I had sent my initial application, I was shortlisted to take part in an interview with the two project supervisors. The interview was not very long and the supervisors wanted to find out more about my passion for the project as well as the leadership aspect of the scholarship. Within a couple of hours, I received an email from the interviewers saying that I had been selected to receive the scholarship. Prior to sending my application, I attended an informative session which gave me tips and advice on how approach the interview. I also talked to staff at the employability office who helped me to prepare my application and subsequently practise for my interview.

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How I got my job: Design Engineer at International Nuclear Services (INS)

Sean Perry

Sean Perry (centre)

Sean Perry graduated from Leeds with a Masters in Automotive Engineering in 2012. He now works as a Design Engineer for INS, a role he secured through the nucelargraduates scheme.  In this post he outlines how he got this job and shares his advice for other students and graduates.

The Role

Within INS I act as part of a team of engineers with specialist experience in the design and licencing of Transport Packages and supporting equipment that are used to transport radioactive material around the world. My day to day tasks include; producing 3D designs using CAD packages, transforming 3D CAD models to manufacturing drawings and performing structural calculations to substantiate the designs. Continue reading

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How I got my job: Secondment on the role of science and engineering in policy and parliament

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Katie Timms is undertaking a PhD in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Leeds’ Institute of Medical & Biological Engineering, following her undergraduate degree in Medical Sciences (2015), also from the University of Leeds.  In this post she explains why she chose to do a secondment during her PhD and how networking and her proactive approach helped her to secure it.

Why did I decide to undertake a secondment?

Browsing through twitter one afternoon I came across a poster describing alternative careers for scientists, based on the Science Council’s ’10 type of scientists’. In case you were wondering, there’s a quiz on the Science Council’s website! I have always been interested in science and research, but was curious about the alternative careers available following my PhD. Continue reading

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3 ways LinkedIn can help you find relevant employers: Part 2

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This is the 2nd post in our 3-part mini series outlining 3 key ways LinkedIn can help you find potential employers, whether this be for jobs, experience or placements.

This post outlines how you can use the company search feature to identify employers by location and sector. Part 1 of the series outlines how the advanced people search function can help you identify potential employers.

Whether you’re looking for experience, placements or a graduate job, it can sometimes be hard to identify potential relevant employers.  This is particularly so if you’re looking outside of the large multi-national organisations. Opportunities with other types of employers, or in other sectors, may not be as widely advertised, and many people actually find jobs and experience by pro-actively approaching employers of interest on a speculative basis. In this 3-part mini series, we’ll show you 3 easy ways you can leverage LinkedIn to identify potential employers of interest.

You may be interested in a particular sector/s and location/s.  This is a great, and useful, starting point to begin researching potential employers.  LinkedIn is one of many ways you can start to do this. Continue reading

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Further study or a graduate job? How I got my EngD

Naval1Naval Bhandari studied Computer Science at Leeds, graduating in Summer 2015.  He was interested in going straight into work, but also really interested in research and doing a PhD.  He wrote two posts for us last summer.  In this first post, he outlines how he chose, and landed, his EngD opportunity at the University of Bath and what he found useful when considering doing a EngD.

Whilst at university, I was anxious to get into the real world and get a job, but I loved my academic studies and learning in this environment, so I was torn between a PhD and working after I had finished uni. In my second year, I had spotted a flyer on one of my lecturer’s doors and inquired about it. It was for an EngD (Doctorate of Engineering) in Computer Graphics/Digital Entertainment. EngD is similar to a PhD but aimed more at those with future interests in industry (there is further information about the differences here). The course structure had the first year be similar to a research masters degree, and the final three years in industry, whilst completing your thesis. It was aimed more towards industrial research as opposed to purely academic research. This seemed like the best of both worlds for me, as I could do full time work, as well as do research! The lecturer who advertised it explained a lot about it to me, including the hardships that come with doing a doctorate and how intense they can be. At that point I already had a placement year lined up, and I was only a second year student, so would have to wait 2 years to apply. I made sure to keep tabs on it until I entered my third year. Continue reading

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Healthcare Science: The NHS Scientist Training Programme

Katie Bjerkan studied BSc Pharmacology at Leeds, graduating in 2015. She gained a place on the NHS STP as a Clinical Pharmaceutical Trainee immediately after her undergraduate degree.  She recently gave a talk at the University about the programme and getting in. This post is a summary of her talk and further information about the STP.

If you want to apply your scientific or technical knowledge in a healthcare setting, in a role which combines scientific or technical work with patient interaction, then a career in Healthcare Science might be for you.

What is a Healthcare Science?

Healthcare science encompasses a diverse range of scientists, engineers and professionals working in the healthcare setting whose aim is to apply scientific principles to improve health and well-being. Although they make up a relatively small proportion of the NHS workforce, healthcare scientists  are involved in about 80% of all clinical decisions. Continue reading

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